20-NONFICTION BOOKS- MUST READ BOOKS IN 2020

Nonfiction Books to read: List of Non-Fiction Books

This is my ideal accompaniment to your summer adventures, whether you’re exploring the great outdoors or sticking close to the A/C. Whether you’re looking to lose yourself in a novel that will transport you to another place or explore the multifaceted world of short stories, there’s something here for you. 

You have come to the right place.Get ready to explore the “amazon nonfiction books list” of 2020. this summer and winter get these “best selling” and “top rated” fiction and nonfiction books. 

Best nonfiction Books to Read this summer and winter

I promise to you, you will love  these subjects like war, motivation ,Biographies & memoirs,political & and social science, history & love, absorbing nonfiction about such diverse subjects.

20-Best list of non-fiction books

BOOKS- 20-NONFICTION BOOKS- MUST READ BOOKS IN 2020

1. Limitless: Upgrade Your Brain, Learn Anything Faster, and Unlock Your Exceptional Life (Jim Kwik)

Release date: April 7, 2020

Category: Business education & reference

Get this book on amazon here

 

Read book review 

The book is a very easy read and helps the reader understand the limitless model which encompasses mind-set, Motivation and Methods. Jim starts with explaining why this is important especially today when we are affected by Digital Dementia and Digital Deduction where the dependency on technology is actually stopping us from using our brains effectively, have better recall and read and learn better.

This is one of the important parts of the book, not only he teaches how to have an improved mindset, motivation and methods, but he takes a step back and shows you why it is essential to your life to excel in all of them to make a difference.

We can turn on the power and tap into the neuroplasticity of our brain. It obviously needs a system and training and this is what the remainder of the book lays out.Read the complete review….. 

2. The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz (Erik Larson)

Release date: February 25, 2020

Category: World War II history

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

In The Splendid and the Vile, Erik Larson shows how Churchill taught the British people “the art of being fearless.” It is a story of political brinkmanship, but it’s also an intimate domestic drama, set against the backdrop of Churchill’s prime-ministerial country home, Chequers; his wartime retreat, Ditchley, where he and his entourage go when the moon is brightest and the bombing threat is highest; and of course 10 Downing Street in London.

 Drawing on diaries, original archival documents, and once-secret intelligence reports–some released only recently–Larson provides a new lens on London’s darkest year through the day-to-day experience of Churchill and his family: his wife, Clementine; their youngest daughter, Mary, who chafes against her parents’ wartime protectiveness; their son, Randolph, and his beautiful, unhappy wife, Pamela; Pamela’s illicit lover, a dashing American emissary; and the advisers in Churchill’s “Secret Circle,” to whom he turns in the hardest moments.Read the complete review….. 

3. How Do We Know We’re Doing It Right (Pandora Sykes)

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

‘Like a very clever, lucid, charming friend unpacking all the messy anxieties of modern existence with tremendous intelligence and elan. Read this book. It will help your life.’

Modern life is full of choices. We’re told that happiness lies within and we can be whoever we want to be. But with endless possibility comes a feeling of restlessness; like we’re somehow failing to live our best life. What does doing it right even look like? And why do so many women feel like they’re getting it wrong?

From faster-than-fast fashion to millennial burnout, the explosion of wellness to the rise of cancel culture, Pandora Sykes interrogates the stories we’ve been sold and the ones we tell ourselves. Wide-ranging, thoughtful and witty, How Do We Know We’re Doing It Right? explores the anxieties and myths that consume our lives and the tools we use to muddle through.

So sit back and take a breath. It’s time to stop worrying about the answers ­– and start delighting in the questions.

4. Joy at Work: Organizing Your Professional Life (Marie Kondo and Scott Sonenshein)

Release date: April 7, 2020

Category: Motivational management & leadership

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

The workplace is a magnet for clutter and mess. Who hasn’t felt drained by wasteful meetings, disorganized papers, endless emails, and unnecessary tasks? These are the modern-day hazards of working, and they can slowly drain the joy from work, limit our chances of career progress, and undermine our well-being. The authors offer stories, studies, and strategies to help you eliminate clutter and make space for work that really matters. They will help you overcome the challenges of workplace mess and enjoy the productivity, success, and happiness that comes with a tidy desk and mind.

5. akespeare in a Divided America: What His Plays Tell Us About Our Past and Future (James Shapiro)

Release date: March 10, 2020

Category: Shakespearean literature

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

From leading scholar James Shapiro, a timely exploration of what Shakespeare’s plays reveal about our divided land, from Revolutionary times to the present day.

Extraordinarily researched, Shakespeare in a Divided America shows that no writer has been more closely embraced by Americans, or has shed more light on the hot-button issues in our history. Indeed, it is by better understanding Shakespeare’s role in American life, Shapiro argues, that we might begin to mend our bitterly divided land.

Read at school by almost every student, staged in theaters across the land, and long highly valued by both conservatives and liberals alike, Shakespeare’s plays are rare common ground in the United States. For well over two centuries now, Americans of all stripes–presidents and activists, writers and soldiers–have turned to Shakespeare’s works to address the nation’s political fault lines, such as manifest destiny, race, gender, immigration, and free speech. 

Read book review 

6. Lady in Waiting: My Extraordinary Life in the Shadow of the Crown (Anne Glenconner) 

Release date: March 24, 2020

Category: Biographies & memoirs

Get this book on amazon here

 

Read book review 

An extraordinary memoir of drama, tragedy, and royal secrets by Anne Glenconner–a close member of the royal circle and lady-in-waiting to Princess Margaret. As seen on Netflix’s The Crown.

Anne Glenconner has been at the center of the royal circle from childhood, when she met and befriended the future Queen Elizabeth II and her sister, the Princess Margaret. Though the firstborn child of the 5th Earl of Leicester, who controlled one of the largest estates in England, as a daughter she was deemed “the greatest disappointment” and unable to inherit. Since then she has needed all her resilience to survive the vipers of court life with her sense of humor intact.

A unique witness to landmark moments in royal history, Maid of Honor at Queen Elizabeth’s coronation, and a lady in waiting to Princess Margaret until her death in 2002, Anne’s life has encompassed extraordinary drama and tragedy. In Lady in Waiting, she will share many intimate royal stories from her time as Princess Margaret’s closest confidante as well as her own battle for survival: her broken-off first engagement on the basis of her “mad blood”; her 54-year marriage to the volatile, unfaithful Colin Tennant, Lord Glenconner, who left his fortune to a former servant; the death in adulthood of two of her sons; a third son she nursed back from a six-month coma following a horrific motorcycle accident. Through it all, Anne has carried on, traveling the world with the royal family, including visiting the White House, and developing the Caribbean island of Mustique as a safe harbor for the rich and famous-hosting Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Raquel Welch, and many other politicians, aristocrats, and celebrities.

7. The Future of Feeling: Building Empathy in a Tech-Obsessed World (Kaitlin Ugolik Phillips)

Release date: February 1, 2020

Category: Computers & technology

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

Journalist and debut author Phillips explores the interaction between human feelings and technology in a survey whose ever-shifting scope results in a collection of interesting parts that never coalesce into a satisfying whole. Phillips opens with a Facebook interaction gone wrong, which inspired her “search for hope about the future of empathy.”

 It starts promisingly, with a discussion of empathy’s perceived decline, and solutions for addressing this, such as the app Faciloscope, designed to detect indicators that an online conversation is derailing into an unproductive flameout, or an interactive online game, Face the Future, which asks students to imagine a future in which feelings can be transmitted online through ubiquitous smartphone-like devices. 

As the book progresses, the focus blurs, as a discussion of virtual reality’s empathy-building potential shifts into an entire chapter on the technology’s use in news reporting. Phillips’s tone is optimistic about the devices and programs she covers, but the notion that more technology is actually the best solution for tech-induced empathy gaps is questionable. Readers who reach the end of this fitfully stimulating book may instead feel that, as one interview subject notes, “the best thing you can do is talk to people.” Agent: Jill Marsal, Marsal Lyon Literary. (Feb.)

8. Apropos of Nothing (Woody Allen)

Release date: March 23, 2020

Category: Biographies & memoirs

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

The Long-Awaited, Enormously Entertaining Memoir by One of the Great Artists of Our Time—Now a New York Times, USA Today,

Los Angeles Times, and Publisher’s Weekly Bestseller.

In this candid and often hilarious memoir, the celebrated director, comedian, writer, and actor offers a comprehensive, personal look at his tumultuous life. Beginning with his Brooklyn childhood and his stint as a writer for the Sid Caesar variety show in the early days of television, working alongside comedy greats, Allen tells of his difficult early days doing standup before he achieved recognition and success.

 With his unique storytelling pizzazz, he recounts his departure into moviemaking, with such slapstick comedies as Take the Money and Run, and revisits his entire, sixty-year-long, and enormously productive career as a writer and director, from his classics Annie Hall, Manhattan, and Annie and Her Sisters to his most recent films, including Midnight in Paris. 

Along the way, he discusses his marriages, his romances and famous friendships, his jazz playing, and his books and plays. We learn about his demons, his mistakes, his successes, and those he loved, worked with, and learned from in equal measure. Read the complete review….. 

9. The Women with Silver Wings (Katherine Sharp Landdeck)

Release date: April 21, 2020

Category: Women in history

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

The thrilling true story of the daring female aviators who helped the United States win World War II–only to be forgotten by the country they served.

When Japanese planes executed a sneak attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Cornelia Fort was already in the air. At twenty-two, Cornelia had escaped Nashville’s debutante scene for a fresh start as a flight instructor in Hawaii. She and her student were in the middle of their lesson when the bombs began to fall, and they barely made it back to ground that morning. Still, when the U.S. Army Air Forces put out a call for women pilots to aid the war effort, Cornelia was one of the first to respond. She became one of just over 1,100 women from across the nation to make it through the Army’s rigorous selection process and earn her silver wings.

In The Women with Silver Wings, historian Katherine Sharp Landdeck introduces us to these young women as they meet even-tempered, methodical Nancy Love and demanding visionary Jacqueline Cochran, the trailblazing pilots who first envisioned sending American women into the air, and whose rivalry would define the Women Airforce Service Pilots. For women like Cornelia, it was a chance to serve their country–and to prove that women aviators were just as skilled and able as men.

10. Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism (Anne Case and Angus Deaton)

Release date: March 17, 2020

Category: Psychology

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

From economist Anne Case and Nobel Prize winner Angus Deaton, a groundbreaking account of how the flaws in capitalism are fatal for America’s working class.

Anne Case and Angus Deaton, known for first sounding the alarm about deaths of despair, explain the overwhelming surge in these deaths and shed light on the social and economic forces that are making life harder for the working class. They demonstrate why, for those who used to prosper in America, capitalism is no longer delivering.

Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism paints a troubling portrait of the American dream in decline. For the white working class, today’s America has become a land of broken families and few prospects. As the college educated become healthier and wealthier, adults without a degree are literally dying from pain and despair. In this critically important book, Case and Deaton tie the crisis to the weakening position of labor, the growing power of corporations, and, above all, to a rapacious health-care sector that redistributes working-class wages into the pockets of the wealthy. Capitalism, which over two centuries lifted countless people out of poverty, is now destroying the lives of blue-collar America. Read the complete review….. 

11. The Precipice: Existential Risk and the Future of Humanity (Toby Ord)

Release date: March 24, 2020

Category: Politics & social sciences

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

Drawing on over a decade of research, The Precipice explores the cutting-edge science behind the risks we face. It puts them in the context of the greater story of humanity: showing how ending these risks is among the most pressing moral issues of our time. And it points the way forward, to the actions and strategies that can safeguard humanity.If all goes well, human history is just beginning.

 Our species could survive for billions of years – enough time to end disease, poverty, and injustice, and to flourish in ways unimaginable today. But this vast future is at risk. With the advent of nuclear weapons, humanity entered a new age, where we face existential catastrophes – those from which we could never come back. Since then, these dangers have only multiplied, from climate change to engineered pathogens and artificial intelligence. If we do not act fast to reach a place of safety, it will soon be too late. Read the complete review…..  

12. Valor: A Story of Family, Courage, and Sacrifice from Pearl Harbor to Iwo Jima (Martha MacCallum)

Release date: February 25, 2020

Category: History

Get this book on amazon here

 

Read book review 

Unknown Valor is the story of the Pacific war’s oppressive jungles and deadly beaches where teenagers fought and died, and the war rooms of the leaders  who set the course.  MacCallum explores Hirohito, the Emperor who drove a deadly expansion of the Empire, only to watch the United States relentlessly reclaim it all, at enormous human cost.

Meticulously researched, heart-wrenching, and illuminating, Unknown Valor is the story of the sacrifice made by ordinary American boys, who left home to save the world from tyranny, and left indelible marks on those back home who loved them. 

13. The Radium Girls: They paid with their lives. Their final fight was for justice.

Category: History

Get this book on amazon here

 

Read book review 

Ordinary women in 1920s America. All they wanted was the chance to shine. Be careful what you wish for.‘The first thing we asked was, “Does this stuff hurt you?” And they said, “No.” The company said that it wasn’t dangerous, that we didn’t need to be afraid.’1917.

As a war raged across the world, young American women flocked to work, painting watches, clocks and military dials with a special luminous substance made from radium. It was a fun job, lucrative and glamorous – the girls themselves shone brightly in the dark, covered head to toe in the dust from the paint. They were the radium girls.As the years passed, the women began to suffer from mysterious and crippling illnesses.

 The very thing that had made them feel alive – their work – was in fact slowly killing them: they had been poisoned by the radium paint. Yet their employers denied all responsibility. And so, in the face of unimaginable suffering – in the face of death – these courageous women refused to accept their fate quietly, and instead became determined to fight for justice.

Drawing on previously unpublished sources – including diaries, letters and court transcripts, as well as original interviews with the women’s relatives – The Radium Girls is an intimate narrative account of an unforgettable true story. It is the powerful tale of a group of ordinary women from the Roaring Twenties, who themselves learned how to roar.

14. Rin Tin Tin: The Life and Legend of the World’s Most Famous Dog: The Life and Legend of the World’s Most Famous Dog

Category: History

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

At its core, “Rin Tin Tin “is a poignant exploration of the enduring bond between humans and animals. It is also a richly textured history of twentieth-century entertainment and entrepreneurship. It spans ninety years and explores everything from the shift in status of dogs from working farm hands to beloved family members, from the birth of obedience training to the evolution of dog breeding, from the rise of Hollywood to the past and present of dogs in war. Filled with humor and heart and moments that will move you to tears, Susan Orlean’s first original book since “The Orchid Thief “is an irresistible blend of history, human interest, and masterful storytelling–a dazzling celebration of a great American dog by one of our most gifted writers. 

During the decades that followed, Rinty and his descendants rose and fell with the times, making a tumultuous journey from silent films to talkies, from black-and-white to color, from radio programs to one of the most popular television shows of the baby boom era, “The Adventures of Rin-Tin-Tin.” The canine hero’s legacy was cemented by Duncan and a small group of others–including Bert Leonard, the producer of the TV series, and Daphne Hereford, the owner of the current Rin Tin Tin–who have dedicated their lives to making sure the dog’s legend will never die.

15. Unlimited Memory: How to Use Advanced Learning Strategies to Learn Faster, Remember More and be More Productive

Category: personal growth

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

In this book, you’ll find all the tools, strategies and techniques you need to improve your memory. Kevin Horsley Broke a World Memory Record in 2013…

And You’re About to Learn How to Use His Memory Strategies to Learn Faster, Be More Productive and Achieve More Success Most people never tap into 10% of their potential for memory. In this book, you’re about to learn:

How the World’s Top Memory Experts Concentrate and Remember Any Information at Will, and How You Can Too Do you ever feel like you’re too busy, too stressed or just too distracted to concentrate and get work done? In Unlimited Memory, you’ll learn how the world’s best memory masters get themselves to concentrate at will, anytime they want. When you can easily focus and concentrate on the task at hand, and store and recall useful information, you can easily double your productivity and eliminate wasted time, stress and mistakes at work.

16. The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir

Category: History

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

John Bolton served as National Security Advisor to President Donald Trump for 519 days. A seasoned public servant who had previously worked for Presidents Reagan, Bush #41, and Bush #43, Bolton brought to the administration thirty years of experience in international issues and a reputation for tough, blunt talk. In his memoir, he offers a substantive and factual account of his time in the room where it happened.

17. White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality.

Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, anti-racist educator Robin DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what can be done to engage more constructively.

18. Born A Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. It is also the story of that young man’s relationship with his fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother—his teammate, a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that would ultimately threaten her own life.

The memoir of one man’s coming-of-age, set during the twilight of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed.

Trevor Noah’s unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents’ indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the earliest years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, steal him away. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa’s tyrannical white rule, Trevor and his mother set forth on a grand adventure, living openly and freely and embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle.

19. Killers of the Flower Moon: Oil, Money, Murder and the Birth of the FBI

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

As the death toll climbed, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled it. In desperation, its young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. Together with the Osage he and his undercover team began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. 

From the bestselling author of The Lost City of Z, soon to be a major film starring Charlie Hunnam, Sienna Miller and Robert Pattison, comes a true-life murder story which became one of the newly-created FBI’s first major homicide investigations. 

 In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions and sent their children to study in Europe.

Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And this was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances, and many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered.

20. The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon

Get this book on amazon here

Read book review 

Read book review 

This is a non-fiction book about explorer Percy Fawcett who, along with his son, disappeared in the Amazon while looking for “Z.” Using information from journals and other sources, the author makes his own trip to the Amazon in an attempt to figure out what happened to Fawcett. I really enjoyed reading this book. Along with being entertaining, I found it very educational. I definitely recommend it!

2 thoughts on “20-NONFICTION BOOKS- MUST READ BOOKS IN 2020”

Leave a Comment

Pin It on Pinterest